Race, Disability and Social Justice

Race, Disability and Social Justice

Thinking Justice

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In Episode 5 of Thinking Justice, Dr Dinesh Wadiwel talks us through different theoretical perspectives on justice. Drawing from various political philosophers, we consider how articulations of justice have been shaped by the cultural, social and historical environments in which they emerged. We focus on the work of critical race theorists, disability theorists, feminist scholars and anti-capitalist thinkers to critique the visions of freedom and rights that have been articulated by white western philosophers within the context of colonisation, slavery, patriarchy and class exploitation. We ask what history tells us about the material realities of domination, oppression and violence. If capitalism sustains the inequitable distribution of wealth and income, if whiteness involves a collective delusion about how states have come into being (ignoring theft of sovereignty, genocide and extortion of resources), if we are not rational self-serving self-sufficient individuals but instead communities imbricated in systems of inter-dependence and caring, then how do we imagine what justice looks like? How should we respond to the fundamentally unjust societies in which we live?
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In Episode 5 of Thinking Justice, Dr Dinesh Wadiwel talks us through different theoretical perspectives on justice. Drawing from various political philosophers, we consider how articulations of justice have been shaped by the cultural, social and historical environments in which they emerged. We focus on the work of critical race theorists, disability theorists, feminist scholars and anti-capitalist thinkers to critique the visions of freedom and rights that have been articulated by white western philosophers within the context of colonisation, slavery, patriarchy and class exploitation. We ask what history tells us about the material realities of domination, oppression and violence. If capitalism sustains the inequitable distribution of wealth and income, if whiteness involves a collective delusion about how states have come into being (ignoring theft of sovereignty, genocide and extortion of resources), if we are not rational self-serving self-sufficient individuals but instead communities imbricated in systems of inter-dependence and caring, then how do we imagine what justice looks like? How should we respond to the fundamentally unjust societies in which we live?
...Read More