141: Fire and Rain

141: Fire and Rain

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James Taylor was a talented guy, but early in his career he was having a tough time getting a break. Even when the Beatles signed him to their label, it was at a time that the label was coming unraveled and promotion was scarce. Plus, Taylor had his own issues to deal with. It took some time but he managed to get his act together, get himself cleaned up and get some talented people to work with him on his second album, which fortunately wasn't on Apple Records. With some support from Warner Brothers, Sweet Baby James became a hit album, and "Fire and Rain" became a breakout his for Taylor. "Fire and Rain" is one of those songs that seems to have a lot of weird theories surrounding its subject matter, and the best I can tell you is that most of them are close, but not close enough to be considered correct. But the real stories attached to the song are more compelling, if not quite as exciting. As I promised during the show, here's a sample of the old Smokey Stover comic strip that I referred to: For my money, some of that art suggests that Bill Holman was a big influence on the MAD Magazine crew. It's also likely that Holman himself was influenced by George McManus, the artist behind "Bringing Up Father." Click here for a transcript of this episode. Click here to become a Patron of the show.
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James Taylor was a talented guy, but early in his career he was having a tough time getting a break. Even when the Beatles signed him to their label, it was at a time that the label was coming unraveled and promotion was scarce. Plus, Taylor had his own issues to deal with. It took some time but he managed to get his act together, get himself cleaned up and get some talented people to work with him on his second album, which fortunately wasn't on Apple Records. With some support from Warner Brothers, Sweet Baby James became a hit album, and "Fire and Rain" became a breakout his for Taylor. "Fire and Rain" is one of those songs that seems to have a lot of weird theories surrounding its subject matter, and the best I can tell you is that most of them are close, but not close enough to be considered correct. But the real stories attached to the song are more compelling, if not quite as exciting. As I promised during the show, here's a sample of the old Smokey Stover comic strip that I referred to: For my money, some of that art suggests that Bill Holman was a big influence on the MAD Magazine crew. It's also likely that Holman himself was influenced by George McManus, the artist behind "Bringing Up Father." Click here for a transcript of this episode. Click here to become a Patron of the show.
...Read More